About

 

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Alison Carter (right) discusses stratigraphy with Yijie Zhuang (center) and Rachna Chhay (left). 

I am an archaeologist who has worked in Cambodia for over 10 years. I am currently a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Anthropology Department at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.  I am also an Honorary Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an Honorary Associate at the University of Sydney.

I’m always happy to hear from people, so feel free to contact me via the contact page. 

My PhD research examined Iron Age (500 BC – AD 500) trade networks in mainland Southeast Asia and the emergence of complexity in the Mekong Delta through a study of stone and glass beads.  If you want to read more about my work my Academia.edu Profile is here.

More recently, I have been working with the Greater Angkor Project exploring Angkorian residential patterns and my current project involves undertaking household archaeology at Angkor.

This blog is focused on issues related to archaeology, history, and culture in Cambodia and Southeast Asia more generally. I began blogging while I was doing PhD research in Cambodia in 2008 in order to share my experiences in the field with my friends and family back home.   My time there was  financially supported by a Fulbright IIE grant and a grant from the Center for Khmer Studies.

I return to Cambodia regularly to undertake fieldwork and will use this blog to post some of my own experiences in the field as well as discuss news and articles related to Cambodian culture and archaeology.

I’ve undertaken Khmer language training at SEASSI and with support from two FLAS grants.  I can also recommend my Khmer tutor in Phnom Penh: Sophavy Pho.

My dissertation research has been supported by numerous organizations and I would not have been able to undertake this research without their help:

ACLS/Luce Foundation grant in East and Southeast Asian Archaeology and Early History

Anthropology Department at UW-Madison

Bead Society of LA

Bead Society of Greater Chicago

Bead Study Trust

Center for Southeast Asian Studies at UW-Madison

Geological Society of America

Graduate Women in Science

Portland Bead Society

Fine Print:

This policy is valid from 08 October 2008

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5 responses to “About

  1. Nice doggy! 🙂 I have the cutest chow chow on earth.

    You didn’t say what you’re research is about. I would like to know what your main interests are.

    I was thinking of asking for a scholarship from the Center of Khmer Studies, the one for US students, do you know if they are very competitive? I really need to go back for my PhD and stay for a while. I need to see the panels I’m working on, measure them, do some statistics and would sell my soul (not literally!) to see how they build a dugout canoe today!

  2. I was thinking of asking for a scholarship from the Center of Khmer Studies, the one for US students, do you know if they are very competitive? I really need to go back for my PhD and stay for a while. I need to see the panels I’m working on, measure them, do some statistics and would sell my soul (not literally!) to see how they build a dugout canoe today!
    +1

  3. HI Feliks- Yes! It is definitely worth applying for a CKS fellowship. Their grants are small, so it would not be enough for a long-term project but it would be enough for short-term research!

  4. I like your blog. Few blogs talk about Cambodia.

  5. hello from a current cks fellow 🙂

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